Dionis Escorsa · Works

 

With english subtitles


Con subtítulos en castellano


Y Dionis Escorsa


Y Dionis Escorsa

Y Dionis Escorsa

 

Y Dionis Escorsa

 

Y Dionis Escorsa

 

Y Dionis Escorsa

Y

 

A few years after the Balkan conflict, the inhabitants of a village return to their destroyed houses and meet each other again. The dreams they have during these days reenact old wounds.

This film infiltrates their respective nightmares in order to transmit, from an oneiric state, the psychological scars that lay dormant in the consciousness of many inhabitants of former Yugoslavia.

 

"When Dionis Escorsa tells of the traumas of the Balkan war, he conducts fieldwork in ellipses and does completely without that concerned awkwardness of simplistic mass-media psycology -wich viewers are impatiently waiting for." 

Heinz Peter Schwerfel

 

"Y, Dionís Escorsa’s first feature film (Tortosa, 1970), was released internationally in 2013 at he Kino der Kunst Festival of Munich. It was curated by Hans-Ulrich Obrist.

A low-cost production with the collaboration of amateur actors and the use of one camera and a computer, the film explores the trauma of the Balkan war through an oneiric and surrealist story that lies halfway between fiction and documentary. Thereby Escorsa’s narrative functions like an audio-visual collage where different visions of the traumatic experience of war and its aftermath merge and coexist in the collective memory of a place. The story goes beyond specific viewpoints (victims and executioners, winners and losers) in so far as it reflects the psychological distress —conveyed by the state of anxiety that the nightmare of the traumatic experience provokes—, the loss and need for reconstruction both physical (the land) and mental (its inhabitants).

Following a fragmented structure defined by the nightmare of a soldier that comes back to his destroyed house, the film combines visions and memories of the conflict (bombings in the woods, dead comrades, executions..) with premonitions and moments of projection of the future by means of a metaphorical simile: a tree that extends its roots through the debris of the house in ruins (where the soldier’s father had been murdered) and whose branches grow towards an uncertain future (the birth of his son).

Once Escorsa had filmed the different sequences in the Balkans (mainly in Slunj, a Serbian zone within Croatia), he worked on the script to match the visual pieces with the more recent transition scenes filmed in Spain, Italy and Germany.

The film has been shown in many film festivals such as the Kino der Kunst in Munich, the Xcèntric at the CCCB or the Arts Santa Mònica Flux Festival (both in Barcelona), the Cinemad Film Festival in Madrid or the IBAFF Festival in Murcia. In 2014, Y received the award to the best fiction film at the International Film Festival El Ojo Cojo in Madrid."

David Armengol Digital catalogue of the Caixafórum collection.



Y, A PERSONAL FREE FILM

"At this moment in time, when culture is being belittled by a government that insists on disregarding it and the film industry is finding it impossible to cope with the abusive rise of VAT, when the American multinational companies and its distribution and exhibition networks are being favoured, anything we do to support the continuity and growth of a free and personal cinema is not only a matter of justice, but a struggle for survival. The time has come to vindicate Bela Tarr, Erice, Jaime Rosales, Miguel Gomes, to recuperate such classic film directors as Egoyan, Angelopoulos and Lynch, to leave behind the stories about super heroes, teenage gangs and topical serial killers.

The XCÊNTRIC Festival at the Centre de Cultura Contemporània de Barcelona has had a relevant role in the diffusion of this kind of underground, alternative cinema. During the last celebration of the XCÊNTRIC Film Festival we were able to watch Y by Dionis Escorsa, a film director from Tortosa who began his artistic career as a painter and went on to experiment with photography and video installations not only within the visual arts but in the fields of choreography and theatre.

Among his experimental short films we should mention Rearviews, a tour de force filmed in one single take of over 24 minutes long, projected on the rearview mirror inside a parked automobile and Room Service for Bombed Buildings, in which we follow the hopeless effort of a team of cleaning ladies who wish to put some order in the chaos of destroyed buildings such as the Chinese Embassy or the Ministry of Defence, bombarded by NATO in Belgrade.

In Y, Escorsa’s first feature film, where the letter symbolizes two divergent lines and goes up like a tree emerging from the entrails of the destroyed house, we find several of the topics and stylistic devices that have been present all along his work: the consequences of the Serbian war, the ruins, both as an aesthetic proposal and memory trigger, the demonstrative “loop” of permanence and insistence, the attention to the frame, the predominance of the long take to avoid manipulating reality as much as possible and a cautious use of surrealism. The film describes the journey back home of a group of people who return to Kranja, a Serbian territory within Croatia, ten years after the war that brought about the fragmentation of Yugoslavia. A drunk who sees the corpse of a soldier floating down the river contrasts with the raped woman whose son appears abandoned in the woods and the old woman who walks through the ruins of her house destroyed by bombshells. This main thread allows for a combination of the real and the oneiric, the lived and the imagined, in a succession of images that leaves the spectator to construct his own narrative from his own personal associations.

The connection between war and memory is a theme that Resnais had already introduced in Hiroshima, mon amour and Muriel. Escorsa regards the conflict as “a focalized fall into partiality” but does not analyse it nor tries to give it a certain logical coherence, as Freud sustains that we do with the material of our dreams. Escorsa’s proposal is a brave assertion of the ability that the spectator possesses to assume unfamiliar sensations and integrate them as his own. Thus, cinema generates a creative force that goes beyond the mere act of contemplation and response to predetermined immediate stimuli.

Y unfolds through efficient planning, never intervening between what is shown and its assimilation. The fixed frame is so impeccable that it resembles an abstract painting. As for the camera movements, they are shifts of focus in search of a new target that would add perspective to the previous one.

The present social context increasingly calls for a struggle to create a cinema that constitutes a glance instead of a reverie. It is from this standpoint that we welcome new creators and encourage lovers of cinema to remain loyal to it and search for for daring and risky proposals."

Manuel Quinto El Ciervo, critical and cultural magazine. 2012.


Los habitantes de un pueblo balcánico regresan años después del conflicto a sus casas devastadas y se vuelven a encontrar entre ellos. Los sueños que tienen durante esos días reescenifican viejas heridas.

El film se infiltra en sus respectivas pesadillas para transmitir, desde un estado onírico, las cicatrices que siguen durmientes en las conciencias de muchos habitantes de la ex-Yugoslavia.

 

"Cuando Dionis Escorsa narra los traumas de la guerra balcánica, desarrolla un trabajo de campo en elipsis y lo hace sin la incómoda torpeza de la psicología simplista de los medios de comunicación masivos, que los espectadores esperan con impaciencia."

Heinz Peter Schwerfel

 

"Y" es el primer largometraje de Dionís Escorsa (Tortosa, 1970) y fue presentado internacionalmente en 2013 dentro del festival Kino der Kunst de Múnich, comisariado por Hans-Ulrich Obrist.

Con una producción mínima, la participación de actores no profesionales y simplemente el uso de una cámara y un ordenador, la película explora el trauma de la guerra de los Balcanes a través de un lenguaje onírico y surrealista que da lugar a una historia situada a medio camino entre la ficción y el documental. De este modo, el relato de Escorsa funciona como un collage audiovisual en el que se fusionan y conviven diferentes visiones sobre la experiencia traumática de la guerra y sus secuelas en la memoria colectiva de un lugar. Más allá de posiciones específicas (víctimas y verdugos, vencedores y vencidos), Y refleja la condena psicológica —representada por la angustia de la pesadilla derivada de la vivencia traumática—, la pérdida y la necesidad de reconstrucción tanto física (el territorio) cómo mental (sus habitantes).

Siguiendo una estructura fragmentada y marcada por la pesadilla de un soldado que vuelve a su hogar en ruinas, la película combina visiones y recuerdos del conflicto (bombardeos en el bosque, compañeros muertos, fusilamientos…) con premoniciones y momentos de proyección del futuro por medio de un símil metafórico: un árbol extiende sus raíces entre los escombros de la casa (donde fue asesinado el padre del soldado) y sus ramas crecen hacia un futuro incierto (el nacimiento de su hijo).

Una vez grabadas las diferentes secuencias en los Balcanes (principalmente en Slunj, una zona serbia situada dentro de Croacia), Escorsa trabajó en el guion para encajar las piezas visuales con nuevas escenas de transición grabadas en España, Italia y Alemania.

La película se ha podido ver en numerosos festivales de cine, como el Xcèntric en el CCCB o el Flux Festival del Arts Santa Mònica (ambos en Barcelona), el Cinemad Film Festival de Madrid o el IBAFF de Murcia. En 2014, Y ganó el premio al mejor largometraje de ficción en el Festival Internacional de Cine El Ojo Cojo de Madrid.

David Armengol

 

"Y", UN FILM PERSONAL Y LIBRE

En estos momentos en los que la cultura es abatida por un gobierno contumaz en el menosprecio y la industria del cine va cayendo agobiada por el abusivo aumento del IVA y por el decidido apoyo a las multinacionales americanas y a sus cadenas de distribución y exhibición, todo lo que hagamos por la existencia, permanencia y extensión de un cine hecho con plena libertad personal es, no tan sólo una cuestión de justicia, sino una apuesta por la supervivencia. Es la hora de reivindicar a Bela Tarr, a Erice, a Jaime Rosales, a Miguel Gomes, repasar a esos clásicos que son Egoyan, Angelopoulos y Lynch, abandonando en el espacio a los superhéroes, castigando sin recreo a los adolescentes gamberros y llevando al asilo eutanásico a los serial-killers domingueros.

En la difusión de este tipo de cine a contracorriente, cine de resistencia, diríamos, se distingue el XCÊNTRIC del Centre de Cultura Contemporània de Barcelona, en cuya última sesión de abril hemos podido ver el film “Y” de Dionís Escorsa, un autor tortosino que se inició en la pintura, la fotografía y las videoinstalaciones aplicadas tanto a las artes plásticas, como a la coreografía y al teatro.

Entre sus cortos experimentales destacaríamos “Retrovisiones”, un tour de force resuelto en un único plano de más de 24 minutos fijo en el retrovisor de un automóvil y “Servicio de habitaciones para edificios bombardeados”, en el que seguimos la inútil peripecia de un grupo de mujeres que limpian edificios como la Embajada de China y el Ministerio de Defensa bombardeados por la NATO en Belgrado.

En “Y”, su primer largometraje – la letra simboliza dos líneas divergentes y se erige como el árbol en las entrañas de la casa destruída- , hallamos varias de las constantes temáticas y estilísticas de Escorsa: las consecuencias de la guerra de Serbia, las ruinas como motor de la memoria a la vez que una cierta propuesta estética, el “loop” demostrativo de la permanencia y la insistencia, el cuidado en el encuadre, el predominio del plano largo en detrimento del montaje para no manipular la realidad en lo posible y el recurso muy controlado al surrealismo. La película nos describe la vuelta a casa de unas personas a Krajna, enclave serbio en Croacia, diez años después de la guerra que originó la fragmentación yugoeslava. Un hombre borracho que ve el cadáver de un soldado bajar por el río se contrapone a la mujer violada cuyo hijo parece abandonado en el bosque y a los viejos que recorren las ruinas de su casa en la que están visibles los impactos de los obuses. Este hilo conductor permite mezclar lo real con lo onírico, lo vivido con lo imaginado, en una sucesión de imágenes que permiten al espectador tejer su propio tapiz narrativo a partir de sus asociaciones personales.

Tal asociación de guerra y memoria estaba ya presente en el Resnais de “Hiroshima, mon amour” y “Muriel”. Escorsa considera el conflicto como “caída localizada en la parcialidad”, pero no lo analiza, ni busca ordenarlo según una cierta coherencia lógica, como afirma Freud que hacemos con el material de nuestros sueños. La propuesta de Escorsa es una afirmación valiente sobre la capacidad que posee el espectador de asumir sensaciones ajenas e integrarlas como propias. De esta forma, el cine proporciona actividad y se constituye en motor creativo más allá de su mera contemplación y respuesta a estímulos inmediatos predeterminados.

“Y” se desarrolla a través de una planificación eficaz, nunca interponiéndose entre lo que se muestra y su asimilación. El encuadre fijo está cuidado de manera que incluso nos remite a la pintura abstracta y, en cuanto a los movimientos de cámara, son desplazamientos de la mirada en busca de un nuevo asentamiento que añada una perspectiva al anterior.

Desde esta conyuntura social, en la que cada vez más resulta necesario el combate por un cine que sea mirada y no ensueño, damos la bienvenida a los nuevos creadores y animamos a los que aman el cine a que permanezcan fieles a él y lo vayan a buscar a donde nace con riesgo.

Manuel Quinto

 


Direction, script, camera, edition: Dionis Escorsa
With: Bojana Jelenic, Patricia Maeser, Fran Blanes, Jan Hofmann, Francesc Garriga, Vahida Ramujkic
Sound creation: Alfredo Costa Monteiro
Postproduction: Esteban Bernatas / Andoliado Productions

2012 · 88 min 

Screenings:

Xcèntric film festival · CCCB Barcelona
Kino der Kunst · Arri Kinos · Munich

Picknic Film Festival · Santander
CineMad film festival · Cines Berlanga · Madrid
Flux festival video d'autor · Centre d'art Santa Monica · Barcelona
IBAFF · Filmoteca · Murcia
El Ojo Cojo · Filmoteca, Madrid / Cinemes Boliche, Barcelona

"Reset" Curated by Valentin Roma · Galeria Palmadotze · Vilafranca del Penedés
"Remote Conflicts - Interchangeable Scenes" Curated by Arto Ushan · Neu West Berlin · Berlin

Adquired by the Caixaforum Collection · Barcelona

Best feature fiction film at
El Ojo Cojo Film Festival · Madrid / Barcelona

+ INFO

Y Dionis Escorsa

 

Y Dionis Escorsa

Y Dionis Escorsa

 

Y Dionis Escorsa

Y Dionis Escorsa

 

Y Dionis Escorsa

 

Y Dionis Escorsa

 

Y Dionis Escorsa

 

Y Dionis Escorsa

 

Y Dionis Escorsa

 

Y Dionis Escorsa

 

Y Dionis Escorsa

 

Y Dionis Escorsa

 

Y Dionis Escorsa

 

Y Dionis Escorsa

 

Y Dionis Escorsa

 

Y Dionis Escorsa

 

Y Dionis Escorsa

 

Y Dionis Escorsa

 

Y Dionis Escorsa

 

Y Dionis Escorsa

 

Y Dionis Escorsa

 

Y Dionis Escorsa

 

Y Dionis Escorsa

 

Y Dionis Escorsa

 

Y Dionis Escorsa